Monday, May 12, 2008

Pajamas, Pep Rallies and Posters . . .

Friday is the annual Ride for Missing Children and students in area schools have been involved.
To get ready, students have been raising money, making posters and inviting riders into their classrooms. . . .

In Utica, themed days were held such as PJ’s for Posters where students could wear their pajamas to school if they brought in a quarter to purchase posters.

Other schools adopted riders . . . the adopted riders have been traveling to respective schools giving safety talks and running pep rallies for the past month.

On Friday, Corasanti held a pep rally at Myles Elementary in New Hartford and talked about safety for kids while some off the ride participants rode through the crowd on their bikes. . . . More than a dozen riders from Myles will participate in the event . . .
Pajamas, posters and pep-rallies? . . . People riding bikes through crowds? . . . . I will remember this the next time I write my check for school taxes . . . and vote on the next school budget.

6 comments:

Kim said...

Well. I don't know. It's a good way to get the kids interested, and it does get the word out. As long as they don't do stuff like that EVERY day, I have no problem with it.

clipper said...

Strikeslip, it is simply more of the same for Utica and Proctor. It will continue for a few more years of pouring money into the old building, and then it will suddenly become necessary to tear it down, and build a totally new high school, as Rome did a few years back.

Hey, someone has to keep the construction business stimulated and people working. Most likely it would be someone from out of town, that would win a bid to build a new building though.(sarcasm)

I would seriously think that when a capital project gets into a range over 7 figures, demolition and new construction needs to be addressed in a feasibility study. At least look at the added life to be added with the project, as opposed to a new building.

Being out of the area makes it difficult to keep up with current affairs in the Utica area. It is with that in mind, that I want to express my gratitude for your factual, and well documented postings on this blog, and also on the Clipper's Busy Corner forum.Your efforts do not go unnoticed.

Clipper

Strikeslip said...

I wonder how many substitute teachers are being paid by the taxpayer to take the place of teachers who are riding their bicycles in this even?

Every time you turn around there is another article about some "special event" at school. No wonder graduates can't do simple math and write grammatically correct paragraphs with proper spelling. Schools need to teach the "3 Rs." Let the parents teach the value of serving others ... or let Scouts do it... or the churches.

The students don't need this -- but I sometimes wonder if the Faculty and Staff do.

Anonymous said...

Well you wouldn't want to teach the kids anything about safety would you. Missing children is an IMPORTANT lesson to be learned, ask the family of Sarah Ann Wood or the other families that have lost children.

If your think the Ride for Missing Children is draining your pocket book at your local school, just overlook the schools’ gymnasium, stadium, and theater that are larger then some communities’ theaters, college gymnasium, and stadium.

If you think the Ride for Missing Children is the reason kids are failing at school because its not part of the 3 R’s you forgot the parents who take no time out for their children’s homework let a lone teaching them civics

Anonymous said...

Getting a little ornery, aren't we Strike? Did you hit 75 this year and decide its time to tell those kids to get off your lawn?

nextcube said...

While the Ride For Missing Children is certainly a worthy cause, there's a larger issue in play here. It seems that over the last ten years, it has become commonplace for schools to grant time away from studies (likely in violation of state education regulations) to participate in community activism. It does leave the taxpayer wondering what his money is paying for.