Sunday, March 02, 2008

OK -- But Not in *MY* Backyard . . .

The impression that one gets from reading today's editorial and an accompanying article is that the Observer-Dispatch is cozying up to the idea that NYRI could be a good thing for us . . . as long as it follows that Thruway Corridor.

The O-D argues that the Thruway is the "best" option because:
* It would run along a corridor that is already there.
* It would create less disruption to area neighborhoods.
* It would be more likely to avoid the Marcy Nanotech site, which has been touted as an economic key to the Mohawk Valley’s economic future.
The obvious questions that the OD's 3 arguments should raise are: (1) Isn't the railroad right-of-way that NYRI proposes to use also a "corridor that is already there?" (2) What "area neighborhoods" would a Thruway route disrupt? and (3) Why is a Thruway route less likely to disrupt the Nanotech site than the alternative routes already on the table? The arguments are "B.S."

What about North Utica, Herkimer, Ft. Plain, Canajoharie, Fultonville, Schenectady, and Albany (for example) ? Don't these Mohawk Valley neighborhoods count?
"NYRI has taken a step toward compromise by proposing to run part of the line underground in key areas, including parts of South Utica and New Hartford. That’s not acceptable because it still ravages our region’s rural communities."
2006-0419-5444
What a crock! The O-D editors and our local illuminati either have never driven down the Thruway through the Mohawk Valley (which they like to "call home"), or they care no more about "our region's rural communities" than they do about North Utica .

The view to the left is from the Schoharie Crossing boat launch picnic area. The Auriesville Shrine is on the hill in the distance, and the Thruway is the road running across the middle of the picture. NYRI indicates that it cannot put more than a few miles of the line underground, so imagine 14 story towers following the Thruway. Thousands of people pass through this corridor every day, one of the most scenic parts of the Thruway. What does this do for tourism?

2006-0419-5448-1Here is another shot taken from the Shrine looking toward Ft. Hunter. The Thruway is between the bicyclist and the river, obscured by the crest of the hill. The entire viewshed behind the cyclist will be obliterated by towers if the line is put down the Thruway.

What should be apparent is the willingness of our local elite to throw this region, its people, and its neighbors under the bus ... as long as the "key areas" of South Utica and New Hartford -- as long as "they" -- are unsullied.

Thank you so much for this editorial. It shows your true colors.

2 comments:

Greens and Beans said...

Thank you Strikeslip. The photographs drive our point home exquisitely. This project is idiotically unnecessary. NYRI’s only interest in New York State is profit (no . . . make that HUGE PROFIT). This foreign owned company has no loyalty to the environmentally pristine landscapes that make upstate New York so extraordinarily picturesque. Shame on our elected officials and shame on the Observer Dispatch for betraying us again in terms of legitimizing NYRI’s attempts to carnage our upstate landscapes. This is a disgrace as well as an abomination to everything that makes living in upstate New York preferable to living anywhere else in the world.

Hollis said...

Amen!

There is a movement afoot which suggests that NYRI might be acceptable if certain conditions are met. This moves Upstate NY into a position of weakness and one of negotiating when there is nothing to negotiate.

The sense of citizen outrage has been coopted by politicians and organizations which persume to speak for citizens.

Such is not the case.

More than ever, individuals must reengerize, and if needed, reorganize to fight NYRI. What is happening at this moment is madness.

There is but one response to NYRI and those who think that by putting lipstick on this pig that it will become acceptable to people: Not Here. Not Now. Not Ever.

http://fromrfh.blogspot.com/2008/03/nyri-on-slippery-slope.html